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you'll take 006,021,007 breaths preparing for baby's first

Don’t let RSV take your baby’s breath away.

Pfizer’s ABRYSVO is the only maternal RSV vaccine given to help protect newborns from severe RSV from birth through 6 months*.

Talk to your OB-GYN or other healthcare provider about getting vaccinated with Pfizer's ABRYSVO.

*During 32 through 36 weeks gestation

The first and only RSV vaccine approved for pregnant women to help lower their babies’ risk of RSV from birth to 6 months.

Get vaccinated during weeks 32 through 36 of your pregnancy so you can pass RSV protection to your baby.

With Pfizer’s ABRYSVO, your baby is born with antibodies to help protect them against RSV from birth through the first 6 months of life.

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Pfizer’s vaccine, ABRYSVO, is readily available.


Clinical trials among pregnant women


FDA approval


CDC recommended


Available nationally


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Help protect infants against the risk of RSV from birth

  • Nearly 50% of all RSV hospitalizations during the first year occur during the first 3 months of life.
  • 75-80% of hospitalizations due to RSV happened during the first 6 months of life.
  • Pfizer's ABRYSVO significantly reduced the risk of severe RSV in infants up to 6 months.

RSV is a highly contagious respiratory virus that can make your baby sick, especially if they’re under 6 months old.

ABRYSVO is the only RSV vaccine given to the mother between 32 through 36 weeks of pregnancy to help protect the baby from birth to 6 months.

What is maternal immunization?

  • Maternal immunization refers to the process of vaccinating a pregnant woman so protective antibodies can be passed to the baby through the placenta before birth.
  • During pregnancy, your body naturally passes on antibodies that protect your baby against bacteria and viruses in the first few months of life, before they’re old enough to develop their own protection.
  • It’s a standard practice to immunize pregnant women to give the baby additional antibodies that help protect against a specific disease.
  • Many pregnant women choose to receive a vaccine while they are pregnant so their baby doesn’t have to receive a shot themselves after birth.

Maternal immunization is a choice pregnant women can make to help protect their babies.

Pregnant women should receive Pfizer’s ABRYSVO during weeks 32 through 36 of pregnancy.

Pfizer’s ABRYSVO helps the body create RSV antibodies, that are passed from you to your unborn baby.
The antibodies help protect your baby from getting sick with RSV from birth through 6 months.

Most common side effects of Pfizer’s ABRYSVO

  • Pregnant women who received Pfizer’s ABRYSVO most commonly reported pain at the injection site, headache, muscle pain and nausea.
  • Jaundice, also known as temporary yellowing of the eyes and skin, was seen in 7.2% of infants in ABRYSVO group and 6.7% in the placebo group.
  • Low birth weight was observed in 5.1% of infants in the ABRYSVO group versus 4.4% in the placebo group.

Pfizer’s ABRYSVO is given between weeks 32 through 36 of pregnancy

ABRYSVO was studied in clinical trials including over 7,000 pregnant women and their babies, where 3,695 pregnant women received ABRYSVO and 3,697 received a placebo.

  • Pfizer’s ABRYSVO is the only RSV vaccine that enables a pregnant woman to pass RSV protection to their baby to protect them from birth through their first vulnerable 6 months of life. Pfizer’s ABRYSVO significantly reduced the risk of severe RSV in infants up to 6 months.
  • To avoid the potential risk of preterm birth, Pfizer’s ABRYSVO should be given between weeks 32 through 36 of pregnancy. In clinical trials, there was more pre-term births in the ABRYSVO group vs the placebo group.

View full prescribing information

Get to know more about RSV and protecting your baby with Pfizer’s ABRYSVO

Download the ABRYSVO maternal brochure

Savings and support

Talk to your doctor or pharmacist to see if Pfizer’s ABRYSVO is covered under your insurance plan. Additional savings and support options are available through Pfizer Vaccine Reimbursement Support Services.

Pfizer’s ABRYSVO may be available to you at no cost in accordance with the Inflation Reduction Act.

Learn more

Certain vaccines may be covered or available at lower out-of-pocket costs in Medicare Part D, Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program, or other consumer plans through the Inflation Reduction Act. For more information cms.gov.

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Ask About ABRYSVO

Pregnancy is a time when you may have a lot of questions for your doctor. Start the conversation about RSV and Pfizer’s ABRYSVO today.

Is my baby at risk for RSV?

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization in infants. The risk of your baby being admitted to hospital with RSV is 16x higher than the flu. RSV is very easily spread to people in hospitals, at home, and in nurseries. The largest group of babies requiring hospitalization due to RSV are those aged less than 6 months old.

Other things that can put infants at risk are:

  • Are born prematurely
  • Are up to 12 months old, especially those 6 months and younger
  • Are less than 2 years old with chronic lung disease or heart disease present from birth
  • Have weakened immune systems
  • Have neuromuscular disorders, including difficulty swallowing or clearing mucus from the chest
What could happen if my baby gets RSV?
RSV may cause a baby to develop a severe wet cough, wheezing, difficulty breathing, or even pneumonia. Babies who become sick with severe RSV may need to be admitted to the hospital. There is a risk that babies who become sick with RSV may have problems with their lungs later in life including asthma.
What could I do to help protect my baby against RSV?
Babies are most vulnerable to getting sick from RSV during their first 6 months. That's because a baby's immune system isn't fully developed when they are born and needs time to grow stronger. One way to help protect newborn babies is to vaccinate pregnant women during weeks 32 through 36 of pregnancy. Pfizer’s ABRYSVO is a vaccine for pregnant women that helps protect your baby from severe RSV from birth through the first 6 months of their life.
How does getting vaccinated help protect my baby?
Pfizer’s ABRYSVO helps your body create RSV antibodies that are passed from you to your unborn baby, and helps protect your baby from RSV from birth through 6 months.
Is there a time of year when my baby is at a higher risk of getting RSV?
Like the flu, RSV epidemics follow seasonal patterns. In the United States RSV season typically begins in the early fall and peaks in the winter months. However, the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted the normal RSV season, and the virus may be unpredictable. It’s important to be aware that the virus may potentially be circulating in the community all year round.
What were the most common side effects of Pfizer’s ABRYSVO?

Pregnant women who received ABRYSVO most commonly reported pain at the injection site, headache, muscle pain and nausea.

Jaundice, also known as temporary yellowing of the eyes and skin, was seen in 7.2% of infants in ABRYSVO group and 6.7% in the placebo group.

Low birth weight was observed in 5.1% of infants in the ABRYSVO group versus 4.4% in the placebo group.

How was Pfizer’s ABRYSVO studied in pregnant women?
ABRYSVO was studied in clinical trials including over 7,000 pregnant women and their babies, where 3,695 pregnant women received ABRYSVO and 3,697 received a placebo.
If I’m pregnant, when should I get Pfizer’s ABRYSVO?
Pregnant women should be vaccinated with Pfizer’s ABRYSVO between 32 and 36 weeks of their pregnancy.  This timing is important to avoid the potential risk of preterm birth.
What are some questions I can ask my OB-GYN or other health care provider about Pfizer’s ABRYSVO?
  • Is it safe for my baby if I get vaccinated while pregnant?
  • Is it safe for me?
  • How much protection can my baby get if I receive a vaccine while pregnant?
  • What vaccination options should I know about?
  • When during my pregnancy should I receive a vaccine?
  • If I’m uncomfortable with getting vaccinated while pregnant, what are my other options?

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